Injuries or movement dysfunction?

Posted by Hans Lindgren DC on 29 May 2015 | 0 Comments
I realized then that it was time to change my approach and stop regarding the injuries as separate entities, and instead work out where the mobility dysfunctions originated from.

The first question I had to ask myself was— What would I have done if a patient was seeking my help for the same problems? ...read the full post

DNS Plank

Posted by Hans Lindgren DC on 11 November 2014 | 0 Comments
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To add more challenge to the plank exercise a version called the long lever plank has been introduced. Moving the elbows above in front of the head and thereby spreading the support points further from each other will definitively increase the demand and if performed correctly is a much better option to the traditional version.
The DNS program introduces a planking position which not only is more challenging but also is very functional.
...read the full post

Push-up

Posted by Hans Lindgren DC on 16 October 2014 | 0 Comments
The push-up is an exercise that probably has been around since the beginning of time. It is a very good exercise providing it is performed correctly. Many sports-coaches tell the youngsters to “Drop down and give me 10”. The problem with this is that if the stabilization of the shoulder-blades is not sufficient the benefit of the exercise is negated by the over-load put onto the shoulders. The key to this exercise is to pay close attention to form and not allow any deviations from perfect. ...read the full post

Functional Training Handbook By Craig Liebenson

Posted by Hans Lindgren DC on 27 September 2014 | 0 Comments
The “Functional Training Handbook” is a great publication and I want to congratulate Craig for producing yet another cutting edge publication that will make an important addition to the knowledge library of any coach/practitioner looking to improve their understanding of the functional approach to training and rehabilitation. ...read the full post

The “Short-hand”

Posted by Hans Lindgren DC on 7 March 2014 | 0 Comments
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The “short-foot” concept was introduced into rehabilitation and training by Professor Janda many years ago. The short foot can simply be described as a slight contraction of the intrinsic muscles of the foot thereby making the foot stronger and providing a better support. For the very same reasons it is important to provide a strong supporting hand in all exercises using the hand as support. Faulty loading of the hand will not only result in excessive loading of the wrist but will also severely affect the stabilization of the scapula.
...read the full post